Grief, anger mix as Christians mourn shooting at a church in Egypt’s capital that killed 4

Grief, anger mix as Christians mourn shooting at a church in Egypt’s capital that killed 4

By Associated Press, Published: October 21

CAIRO — The elderly, silver-haired Christian could hardly speak Monday, sitting stunned in a church where the evening before, suspected Islamic militants on a motorcycle sprayed his family’s wedding party with automatic weapons fire, killing his son, his wife’s sister and two granddaughters aged 8 and 12.

“It’s God’s will. They are always beating us down. Every other day now, they do this,” the 75-year-old Fahmy Azer Abboud said as he waited for their funeral to start.

He spoke haltingly of his dead granddaughters, both named Mariam.

“They were pure angels. They had the world’s kindness inside them. They helped me and shared with me everything they had,” Abboud said.

The girls were waiting to enter the Church of the Virgin Mary in Cairo’s Warraq district for the wedding of another of Abboud’s granddaughters when the gunmen struck about 9 p.m. Sunday. The wounded included seven relatives, with his other son, Nabil, among them, he said.

The shooting deepened panic among Egypt’s minority Coptic Christians, already the target of centuries of discrimination by the Muslim majority. It also raised fears that an insurgency by Islamic extremists in the strategic Sinai Peninsula and an increase in attacks in rural areas may be shifting to the capital, a city of 18 million people already beset by crime and poverty.

The violence by Islamic radicals has risen since the military deposed President Mohammed Morsi in July and cracked down on his Muslim Brotherhood and its allies. The attacks have targeted mainly security forces and Christians, whom the Islamists blame because of their strong support of Morsi’s ouster. In Sinai, suspected jihadist fighters have stepped up violence against soldiers and police since the coup.

Sunday’s shooting also recalled an Islamic militant insurgency in the 1980s and 1990s, when extremists waged a campaign against police, Christians and foreign tourists, trying to topple the government of now-ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Many fear a revival of that wave of violence.

High-profile attacks blamed on militants have already begun to creep into Cairo. In September, the interior minister, who heads the police, survived an assassination attempt by a suicide car bombing. Earlier this month, militants fired rocket-propelled grenades on the nation’s largest satellite ground station, also in the capital.

Witnesses said a car blocked traffic outside the Coptic church minutes before the shooting, allowing the gunmen on the motorcycle the space they needed and giving them a relatively easy getaway.

The funeral of the four victims was attended by several thousand Christians who spelled into the street. Their grief was mixed with anger and disbelief.

“With our blood and souls, we will redeem the cross,” they chanted as the four coffins were about to be brought into the church.

Addressing the mourners, a young member of the choir said: “Even in these circumstances, we can only talk of the heavens above and ask for the help of Christ.”

A prayer followed: “Help us, Jesus. Forgive us. Bless us. Our eyes are filled with tears.”